Welcome to McGulpin Point!

McGulpin barn invite Oct 1 2016 web Join us for the grand opening of the historic replica barn Oct. 1, 2016! Public welcome

THANK YOU for visiting us! We welcome tens of thousands of visitors to our site each year, and we enjoy talking with you all and telling you about the rich history of McGulpin Point!

The lighthouse remains open until Nov. 1.

Thank you for your support of and interest in McGulpin Point Lighthouse and Historic Site! Admission is by freewill donation.

Discovery Trail

McGulpin Point Discovery Trail: An intriguing historical journey through generations

The new Discovery Trail at McGulpin Point will bring you back to 9,000 years ago, when our earliest inhabitants lived among these forests and made it their home. Walk the trail to discover native warriors who tread this ground and impacted world-wide events, and later meet the McGulpin ancestors who were the first Europeans to settle this property along the Straits of Mackinac. We hope you enjoy this journey through time at one of Emmet County's, and Michigan's, most important historical landmark sites.

read more...
????????????????????????????????????

Visit our gift shop for one-of-a-kind treasures!

The gift shop at McGulpin Point Lighthouse and Historic Site is stocked each year with unique treasures that reflect life on the Great Lakes and your visit to McGulpin Point. We carry a wide selection of children's books, shipwreck videos and apparel. We also offer merchandise related to the Headlands International Dark Sky Park, our sister property just down the road. You can find Dark Sky t-shirts, hats and other clothing items, as well as jewelry. We welcome you to browse our gift shop while you're in the Mackinaw City area!

read more...
big-rock-image

Big Rock, Big Significance

The Big Rock at McGulpin Point   About 390 years ago, pilgrims momentously set foot on the Eastern seaboard of the U.S. and Plymouth Rock was christened an enduring symbol of American settlement. But 395 years ago, French explorers were plying the Straits of Mackinac and using a rock at least five times the size of Plymouth’s to gauge water levels as they navigated in canoes along the tumultuous waters …

read more...